Licenses and Certifications:

Professional Engineering License, New York State, 1987
Class D Water Distribution Operator's License
Department of Defense certification for Fallout Shelter Evaluation and Certification
New York City Building Department Expeditor: Accorded Professional Status. Provides services in the boroughs of Bronx, Queens (Queens Borough), Brooklyn (Kings County), Manhattan (New York County), and Staten Island (Richmond County).

Experience:

Design, Engineer and Construction Supervisor for many projects in New York City, Westchester County and Putnam County
Distribution Engineer for the Bureau of Water Supply, New York City Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) for 4 years
Proprietor of Vincent A. Ettari, P.E., P.C. since 1987

Professional Memberships:

American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC)
American Concrete Institute (ACI)
American Water Works Association: Operations Member (AWWA)
American Wood Council (AWC)
International Conference of Building Officials (ICBO)
National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)
Westchester Municipal Planning Federation
Yorktown Chamber of Commerce
American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)

Consulting Work to Towns and Villages:

Consulting Engineer to Village of Brewster Board of Trustees: 2001

Articles and Publications Concerning Engineering and Planning Issues:

New York Real Estate Journal, March 27, 2006: "Obtain the Necessary Permits and Do Your Homework Before Closing on a Property You Hope to Develop" (Article discusses the permitting and approval process associated with land development)
   
New York Real Estate Journal, June 26, 2006: "Does Your Site Have Excessive Slopes? What to consider when developing land with steep slopes" (This Article, which is the first in a three part series, discusses the standards for grading and slopes promulgated in various local town codes and in the Building Code of New York State and some of the standards for retaining walls promulgated in the Building Code of New York State)
 
bullet New York Real Estate Journal, July 24, 2006: "Does Your Site Have Excessive Slopes? What to consider when developing land with steep slopes" (The Article, which is the second in a three part series, discusses and contrasts various types of retaining walls and provides a brief discussion concerning the soil and engineering mechanics which are involved in the design and construction of retaining walls)
   
bullet New York Real Estate Journal, August 21, 2006: "Does Your Site Have Excessive Slopes? What to consider when developing land with steep slopes" (This Article, which is the third in a three part series, presents a closing discussion concerning the need to have a Licensed Professional Engineer design a desired retaining wall and the need of obtaining a Site Plan Approval from the local Planning, Environmental, and / or Zoning Boards of the local municipality for any retaining walls which will be constructed on commercial or industrial premises)
   
bullet New York Real Estate Journal, December 30, 2008: "Are You Contemplating Subdividing a Parcel of Land? Then You Should Know About the Design and Installation of Water Mains." (This Article, which is the first in a four part series, discusses the permitting and approval process associated with obtaining an Approval for the laying of new water mains.)
   
bullet New York Real Estate Journal, January 27, 2009: "Are You Contemplating Subdividing a Parcel of Land? Then You Should Know About the Design and Installation of Water Mains." (This Article, which is the second in a four part series, discusses the various types of pipes used as water mains. It also discusses the need for the design and installation of the water mains to conform to the 10 States Standards.)
   
bullet New York Real Estate Journal, February 24, 2009: "Are You Contemplating Subdividing a Parcel of Land? Then You Should Know About the Design and Installation of Water Mains." (This Article, which is the third in a four part series, discusses the requirements of New York State concerning the protection of surrounding properties during the construction process and the protection of the workers who will install the water mains. The actual process of the laying of the pipes is also discussed in this article.)
   
bullet New York Real Estate Journal, March 10, 2009: "Are You Contemplating Subdividing a Parcel of Land? Then You Should Know About the Design and Installation of Water Mains." (This Article, which is the fourth in a four part series, discusses additional criteria concerning the actual process of the laying of the water main pipes.)
 

Education:

Vincent A. Ettari received his degree in Civil Engineering from Manhattan College, where he was a Dean's List student and admitted to the Chi Epsilon National Civil Engineering Honor Society.

 

Continuing Education Classes Designed and Taught By Vincent A. Ettari, P.E.:

The following Continuing Education Classes were approved by the New York State Department of Education.  They were designed by Mr. Ettari and are being offered through Professional Engineering Continuing Education (www.pece.biz), which is a New York State Education Department approved sponsor of continuing education courses for licensed engineers.  These courses were approved by the New York State Education Department as Approved Continuing Education Courses for Licensed Professional Engineers.

Mr. Ettari has designed and taught the following classes:

  • Design and Installation Criteria for Water Supply Mains.  This course presented the following topics: Applicability and Requirements of the 10 States Standards; Excavation Requirements of Industrial Code Rule 23; Requirements of Industrial Code Rule 753; Location of Subsurface Utilities and Natural Features; Pipe Type; Design of the Water Mains; Installation of the Water Mains

  • Computation of Storm Water Runoff and the Design and Installation Criteria for Storm Water Mains, Drainage Culverts, and Storm Water Retention Facilities.  This course presented the following topics: Determination of the Watershed; Identification of the Design Storm; Determination of Land Uses and Soil Types in the Watershed; Computation of Cn and C Runoff Coefficients; Computation of Storm Water Runoff (SCS Method and Rational Method); Sizing and Design of Drainage Pipes; Design of Stormwater Storage Facilities.

  • Design of Site Plans - Part 1.  This course presented the following topics: Municipal Code Requirements for Site Plans; Generation of Topographic Maps; Design of Grading Plans and the Setting of Proposed Slopes; Determination and Plotting of the Locations of Wells, Septic Systems, Flood Plains, and Wetlands; and the Design of Retaining Walls.

  • Design of Site Plans - Part 2.  This course presented the following topics: Code Requirements for Site Plans; Topographic Maps; Application of Zoning Rules to the Setting of Buildings; Design of Parking Lots for Commercial and Industrial Buildings (Setting Grades & Slopes of Parking Lots, Layout of Parking Spaces, Design of Loading Areas, Curbs, Pedestrian Means of Egress, and Design of Means of Egress for Handicapped Persons, Structural Loads, etc.); Design of Access Drives for Commercial and Industrial Buildings (Setting Grades & Slopes of Access Drives, Design of Horizontal and Vertical Curves, Design of Curbs, Structural Loads, etc.); Design of Parking Lots and Access Drives to Accommodate Snow & Ice Removal and Storage during Winter Months.

  • Design of New Low-Rise Commercial, Mercantile, and Office Buildings - Part 1.   This course presented the following topics: Applicability of the New York State Building Code, the New York City Building Code, and the International Building Code; Supplemental Building Codes adopted by other Municipalities in New York State; Applicability and Use of Reference Standards; Design of Handicapped and Non-Handicapped Means of Egress; Computation of Point and Uniform Live Loads; Computation of Weight and Dead Loads; Computation of Environmental Loads; Loads which Cabinetry, Grab-Bars, Handrails, and Guardrails must be able to Support; Loads which Decks and Deck Railings must be able to Support

  • Design of New Low-Rise Commercial, Mercantile, and Office Buildings - Part 2.  This course presented the following topics: Applicability of the New York State Building Code, the New York City Building Code, and the International Building Code; Supplemental Building Codes adopted by other Municipalities in New York State; Applicability and Use of Reference Standards; Computation of Point and Uniform Live Loads; Computation of Weight and Dead Loads; Computation of Environmental Loads Detailed Computation of Balanced Snow Loads, Snow Drift Loads, and Snow Slide Loads; Loads which Cabinetry, Handrails, and Guardrails must be able to Support; Loads which Decks and Deck Railings must be able to Support; Loads which Driveways must be able to Support; Application of Ultimate Strength Design and Allowable Stress Design; Analysis and Design of Roof Rafters, Ceiling Joists, Floor Systems, Beams, Columns, Walls and Footings; Design of Steel, Wood, and Reinforced Concrete Structural Elements

Mr. Ettari has designed and obtained approval for the following classes:

  • Design and Installation Criteria for Septic Systems and Sanitary Sewer Mains

  • Design of Site Plans - Part 3.  This course will present the following topics:
    Design of Sidewalks for Commercial and Industrial Buildings (Allowable Grades and Slopes, Design Loads, Design of Sidewalk Chambers, Design of Sidewalk Curb Cuts, Design of Sidewalks for Handicapped Persons, Friction Issues, etc.); Design of Ramps for Commercial and Industrial Buildings (Allowable Grades and Slopes, Handrail Requirements, Design Loads, Friction Issues, etc.); Design of Exterior Stairways (Allowable Tread Depths and Riser Heights, Handrail Requirements, Design Loads, Friction Issues, etc.); Design of On-Site Sanitary Facilities; Design of On-Site Drainage Systems



New York City Code Issues:

While this firm is primarily engaged in the rendering of design services, we do, as requested, perform inspection work related to engineering, construction, and code issues. In so doing, we have noticed that there seems to be a misconception in the building community about the application of codes to premises in New York City.

The City of New York promulgated a building Code going back to the late 1800's. In 1915, it started to adopt Articles which ultimately became chapters of a defined building code in 1916. Those Articles were superseded in 1938 by the Building Code of the City of New York. While the City did promulgate a building code for various building elements between 1915 and 1938, various building elements, particularly the stairways of residential builds, remained, by and large, subject to the requirements of the 1901 Tenement House Code. For instance, geometrical parameters for stairways in residential multifamily tenement houses constructed between 1915 and 1938, such as tread width and riser height, were not subject to the requirements of the 1915/1916 Building Code. Rather, they were subject to the requirements of the 1901 Tenement House Code. This firm has copies of that Code.

In 1968, New York City adopted a new building code. During that time, renovations made to pre-1968 Buildings were permitted, under various circumstances, to be made in conformity with the requirements of the 1938 Code. Moreover, the 1968 Code did not require the reconstruction or replacement of most items in an existing building (such as stairways and ramps, which were permitted to remain in use without change). That is, the stairways, and other aspects of the Means of Egress, of most buildings constructed before 1968 remained subject to the requirements of the earlier codes under which they were constructed.

Effective 2008, New York City has adopted the 2008 New York City Building Code. That Code is now applicable to the construction of new buildings. That is, New York City is currently promulgating its 2008 Building Code. Like the 1968 and 1938 Building Codes, this new 2008 Code allows most existing items in a building, such as ramps and stairs, to remain in place and in use.

The only way to know to which edition of the City Building Code an item is subject (pre-1915, 1915/1916, 1938, or the 1968 Edition) is to conduct a historical search on the building. All the records for the item in question must be examined, going back to the time the building was first constructed. Often, unknowledgeable engineers and architects apply the requirements of the 1968 Code or the 2008 Code to items such as stairway risers and treads when the records clearly show that the item is not subject to either of these two Codes. We often wonder how many times people have been in disputes over whether an item meets the requirements of the 1968 or 2008 Codes when, in fact, the item was constructed under the requirements of the Tenement House Law, the 1915/1916 Code, or the 1938 Building Code.

Fortunately, this firm is authorized by New York City to pull records from the Building Department Archives and have them copied at DR II. Moreover, this firm, since it is engaged in on-going design work, has copies of the Tenement House Law and copies of the New York City Building Code going as far back as the late 1800's. This firm also has copies of several editions of the 1938 Building Code, several editions of the 1968 Code, and the 2008 Code. As a result, this firm is able to identify when an item was constructed and then determine to which standards it was required to conform.

House Inspection:

Are you contemplating buying a home. Then you should be aware that since 1970, all wall-mounted kitchen and vanity cabinets have been required, by code, to be able to support a load of 500 – 600 pounds without falling apart or falling off of the wall. Did your house inspector test the cabinets of the home you are planning on buying to make sure that the cabinets meet this critical load requirement? If not, you may want to consider having a Licensed Professional Engineer test the cabinets in a code-compliant manner to ensure that they can meet this critical requirement which applies to the installation of kitchen and vanity cabinetry. Make sure that a loose kitchen or bathroom vanity cabinet does not fail, detach, or result in an accident by having them properly tested and evaluated.

Continuing Education:

If you are in need of continuing education courses in engineering, Vincent A. Ettari, P.E., P.C., suggests that you confer with the firm Professional Engineering Continuing Education (www.pece.biz). You will find that the Continuing Education Courses which I teach are offered through this Educational Service.

Also, if you are considering examining engineering structures overseas (particularly Europe), Vincent A. Ettari, P.E., P.C., suggests that you contact the following tour agencies. They can provide excellent educational opportunities for engineers and architect who wish to learn how engineering and architecture is practiced overseas.


For Austria, I recommend Edelweiss Tours:

edelweiss
Edelweiss Tours KG
A 5020 Salzburg, Schwarzstraße 18/Theatergasse 1
Tel./Fax + 43 662 875767
Mobile + 43 699 17189289
office@edelweisstours.at
www.edelweisstours.at





For Ukraine, I recommend Tours 2 Kiev:

kiev
Tours 2 Kiev and Ukraine
Voloshskaya, 24, Kyiv, Ukraine
www.tour2kiev.com
Telephone +38 044-451-61-71
Mobile +38 067-463-46-03


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